“Mum’s the word” from the Mega developers, OMB and County of Simcoe about expanding Greenbelt environmental protection.

November 20, 2015

So we’re supposed to rest easy with the OMB-approved county Official Plan on the way? Right??

greenbelt-expanded

The Oak Ridges Moraine Partnership and the Ontario Greenbelt Alliance have proposed Ontario’s Greenbelt expand to include almost 300,000 hectares in Simcoe County. The proposed area is shown in dark green and includes Lake Simcoe, the Oro Moraine, the Nottawasaga River Watershed and the Minesing Wetlands. SUBMITTED PHOTO

An interesting Barrie Advance article by Sara Carson called Groups ask province to expand Ontario’s Greenbelt (curiously not online but available in pdf)

When you drink tap water, take a shower and swim in a local lake, you want that water to be clean and safe.

This is why the Simcoe County Greenbelt Coalition is asking the province to expand Ontario’s Greenbelt in our area.

“People get behind the Lake Simcoe Protection Plan. This is just the next logical step,” said coalition co-chair-person Margaret Prophet.

Ontario’s Greenbelt is a 1.8-million-acre parcel of protected farmland, wetland and forest stretching from the Greater Toronto Area north to Tobermory. In Simcoe County, the Greenbelt covers Holland Marsh crop areas in Bradford West Gwillimbury and Innisfil as well as portions of Adjala-Tosorontio and New Tecumseth.

Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing spokesperson Conrad Spezowka said the province is committed to growing the Greenbelt. In the spring, the ministry completed a series of public consultations to review four provincial growth plans and to consider Greenbelt expansion.

“Municipal interest to date has been on adding urban river valleys within existing urban areas. This builds on the Greenbelt Plan amendment, which recognizes urban river valleys as important connections to the Great Lakes and will help municipalities in identifying possible areas for Greenbelt expansion,” Spezowska said

Proposed amendments will come forward in the winter of 2016, he added.

More than 100 community groups, including the Simcoe County Greenbelt Coalition and Ontario Greenbelt Alliance, have asked the province to nearly double the size of the Greenbelt to add 1.5 million acres of land containing vital water resources. In Simcoe County this includes almost 300,000 hectares of land covering the Lake Simcoe watershed, the Oro Moraine, the Nottawasaga River Wetlands, which supply and purify clean drinking water for most resident of the county, Prophet said.

“We’re hoping at the lest the vulnerable water areas of Simcoe County would be protected,” she added. “Only a portion of the Lake Simcoe watershed is protected.”

Cheryl Shindruk, a member of the Midhurst Landowners Group, declined comment on the Simcoe County Greenbelt Coalition’s plan to grow the greenbelt. The landowners group is made up of five development companies.

“When the Crombie report is made public, we will consider its recommendations and make comment if necessary, but we will not be commenting on any individual submissions from any group to the Crombie panel,” Shindruk said.

David Crombie chairs the six-member provincial growth plan review panel.

The Barrie Advance requested an interview with a County of Simcoe representative regarding the greenbelt expansion. In a prepared statement, Warden Gerry Marshall said the county does not comment on matters between the Simcoe County Greenbelt Coalition and the province. He provided a stateme4nt about the county’s planning policies.

Marshall said the county’s updated official plan, under review at the Ontario Municipal Board, would expand the amount of protected green lands, significantly increase protection of wetland areas and protect farmland.

“The county is setting density targets with fixed boundaries for all settlement areas,” he added.

“Once approved, Simcoe County would have some of the most stringent land use protection policies and designations in the province. These are very strong planning policies that provide a responsible balance to protect our lands and resources, while fostering growth by creating new regional transportation options, supporting economic prosperity and encouraging healthy, vibrant communities,” Marshall said.

During the next 26 years, the county’s population will expand by 164,703 residents and the Simcoe County Greenbelt Coalition questions what this means for our water supply. Prophet said greenbelt protection would ensure the water remains healthy throughout development.

“If we really want Simcoe County to grow in a sensible way, to make sure what we have now is preserved for future generations or even healthier than what we have, then now is the time to stand behind our water because once it’s compromised it’s compromised,” she said.

20151119 Margaret Prophet

Margaret Prophet, co-chair of the Simcoe County Greenbelt Coalition. SUBMITTED PHOTO

It said they would “not be able to handle much more effluent without he water quality being compromised and that was back nine years ago,” she said.

And we already see evidence the county’s water quality and supply is declining with summer water restrictions and beach closures, she added.

“Those things have started to impact our daily life and those are indicators that the water isn’t plentiful, or necessarily healthy in our area.”

Water restrictions have been commonplace in Barrie, Springwater and Orillia. This past summer, Thornton issued a water ban when water supply reached critical levels, Prophet noted.

Note: The public record shows the connections between the Midhurst Secondary Plan, Midhurst Landowners’ Group, Geranium Corporation and Ms. Shindruk. There are some related articles here about these relationships.

Originally published on DemocracyWatchSimcoe.ca.

 

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Will the Greenbelt panel headed by former Toronto Mayor David Crombie “mean business” by stopping sprawl?

November 11, 2015

An article by Dr. John Bacher called Ontario May Finally Be Getting Serious About Stopping Urban Sprawl:

During the Second World War, one of the great intellectuals of our time, George Orwell, penned an essay about what the course of action for a Labour Party government he hoped for would be following a victorious peace. He contemplated what such a government would do if it were serious and “meant business.”

As it turned out, Orwell was quite prophetic in anticipating what a Labour Party government would do. It did truly “mean business.”

Major greenbelts were established around growing cities such as London. They have become so effective that the rate of loss of rural land after Labour’s landslide victory in 1945 became minuscule compared to the impacts of urban sprawl after the First World War.

20151111 John bacherOntario may be ready to spare more green places like the one on the left from what became of it on the right.

Here in Ontario, with the exception of protecting Niagara’s unique fruit lands, the designation in 2005 of a Greenbelt in Niagara and other parts of the Golden Horseshoe, was not a sign that the province “meant business” about stopping urban sprawl. This was because virtually everywhere else in the province, there was a gap in between the actual urban zoning boundary and the borders of the Greenbelt.

The agricultural and environmental protection zoned lands left out of the Greenbelt were given to expressive names. One was the “White Belt”, reflecting the colour on maps in between the Greenbelt and the grey urban boundary. An environmental protection group the Neptis Foundation came up with a more mocking phrase, inverting a planning designation of the Greenbelt Plan. This was to call the “White Belt”, “the Unprotected Countryside.”

In a 2005 study, released shortly before the passage of the Greenbelt legislation, Neptis calculated that the “Unprotected Countryside”, would create a land use planning disaster.

The “Unprotected Countryside” put 146,700 hectares of rural land at risk for sprawl. It found that even if the Greenbelt borders were extended right up to the actual urban zoning limits, densities would still be too low to efficiently encourage a high level of service for transit.

Neptis’ fears have come true in a most disturbing way. Through isolated hearings of the Ontario Municipal Board, (OMB), chunks of the Unprotected Countryside have passed from agricultural to urban zoning. Some 17,500 hectares of formerly agriculturally zoned land are now in urban land use designations, shrinking the White Belt to 129,500 hectares. One of the worst consequences of this sprawl will be its eventual consequences, once the land is actually built upon, on the ability of watersheds to support life.

White Belt sprawl hits lands that are very ecologically sensitive, impacting some of the province’s most vulnerable watersheds, lakes and streams.

In Hamilton, OMB hearings have led to the urbanization of hundreds of hectares of White Belt lands. This has impacted the headwaters of Twenty Mile Creek, which is already dry for most of the year, except for isolated ponds where fish such as the Northern Pike struggle to survive in the summer.

In 2005, there was a Lake Simcoe White Belt in Newmarket and Aurora. All these formerly agriculturally zoned lands are now in urban designations. To accommodate the anticipate flush of storm water, a new sewage treatment plant will have to be built at Holland Landing. This threatens the precarious Lake Trout and Whitefish populations of Lake Simcoe with a toxic tide of phosphorous loadings.

John Bacher SpringwaterThreatened landscape in Midhurst near Springwater Provincial Park north of Toronto. Land on left is in park and immediately to right is threatened by urban sprawl.

A provincially endowed but independent think tank, the Greenbelt Foundation, recently issued a study that hopefully is a sign that the province is getting ready to mean business in tackling sprawl. It is appropriately titled, “Growing the Greenbelt to Protect Vulnerable Water Resources in the Greater Golden Horseshoe Region.”

Hopefully the release of “Growing the Greenbelt” is a sign that the province is preparing to cut back the bloated White Belt to protect our precious watersheds. It proposes to do this in three areas that encompass all headwaters of significant streams.

Two areas are part of the Oak Ridges Moraine in the Humber and Rouge watersheds. The third is a fragile stream with a more vulnerable headwaters area, Carruthers Creek in Pickering.

The “Growing the Greenbelt” report notes that 1,500 hectares of the Carruthers Creek headwaters area is threatened by urbanization supported by Durham Region. It notes that, “An Environmental Assessment produced by Ajax found that upstream development of the headwaters would increase downstream flooding in Ajax, directly impacting more than 1,000 residents, and causing an increase in flood speed at levels of up to 132 per cent.”

Pollution from development in the headwaters put two native cold water fish species at risk, the Mottled Scuplin and the endangered Redside Dace. It also jeopardizes a fishery of Rainbow Trout. A watershed study by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) found the threatened headwaters are important for threatened Bobolink, Meadowlark and Monarch butterflies. They are also a resting refuge for migrating birds.

“Growing the Greenbelt” documents carefully the ecological threats posed by the urbanization of the Rouge headwaters in Markham, some 2,000 hectares. It concludes that, “Enveloped on three sides by the Greenbelt, protection and enhancement of these lands can provide important natural connections to the highly fragmented watershed and help reverse a serious decline in water quality downstream.”

In addition to the cold water Mottled Sculpin and Rainbow Darter, the Rouge here provides habitat for another good ecological indicator, the Brook Lamprey. A TRCA watershed study finds that these species are all “on the threshold of decline.” It warns that urbanization would bring about consequences similar to those on the Rouge’s most degraded tributary, Beaver Creek, where there is a “higher concentration of phosphorous and E. Coli.”

A TRCA watershed study for the Humber River also notes the threats posed by expansion into the White Belt. It has identified such “harmful impacts of urbanization” on “water balance, water quality, natural cover, aquatic and terrestrial communities, cultural heritage and air quality. These effects include increased surface runoff, more water pollution, greater annual flow volume in rivers and streams, increased erosion and sedimentation, channel instability and losses of cultural heritage and biodiversity.”

In addition to greening the White Belt the “Growing the Greenbelt” report identifies the need to stop 2,000 acres of sprawl in the Midhurst area of Springwater Township, located in the headwaters of the Nottawasaga River. A two year struggle involving a native occupation was required to stop the proposed closure of Springwater Provincial Park, an important source of water for the Minesing wetland. The report stresses the need to grow the Greenbelt here to protect “large swaths of recharge lands” vital for this significant wetland complex.

The “Growing the Greenbelt” report also listened to the City Council of Thorold which for a decade has been calling for the extension of the Greenbelt around Lake Gibson. It stresses an area that “supplies drinking water to half of Niagara Region, including St. Catharines and Niagara on the Lake, with an estimated 150,000 residents dependent on these supplies. The Lake also supplies flow to coldwater streams, many with brook trout populations and provides habitat for water birds such as herons. Largely forested, the area connects Short Hills Provincial Park and the Welland Canal.”

It is to be hoped that “Growing the Greenbelt” reflects the still secret recommendations of the hearing panel on the provincial Co-ordinated Plan review, headed by former Toronto Mayor, David Crombie. If this is the case, it may be a good sign that the province is finally meaning business when it comes to protecting our watersheds.

John Bacher is a veteran conservationist in Niagara, Ontario and long-time member of the citizen group, Preservation of Agricultural Lands Society. A past contributor of posts to Niagara At Large, his most recent book is called ‘Two Billion Trees and Counting – The Legacy of Edmund Zavitz’.


The Midhurst Secondary Plan will never happen.

November 7, 2015

No 10,000 sprawl homes plunked down on Class 1 and 2 agricultural land.

barrie-wastewater

No threat to Minesing Wetlands–Nottawasaga River–Wasaga Beach (Nottawasaga Valley version) or Lake Simcoe (Lake Simcoe watershed alternative).

swtp

The real money was always in buying Barrie’s waste water and water supply (privatizing a public asset).

Public (non-native and native) revulsion to that plan changes the internal rate of return on this utility bill (NOT housing) project.

They’ll walk away using one of +100 environmental pretenses to save face.


Just how frequently has iLoveMidhurst.ca been viewed since December 2011?

September 26, 2015

In total, 53,915 times, 1,198 monthly, or 39.9 views per day.

20150926 Traffic ilm

The 10 most viewed posts in 2015 are:

  1. Why are people nailing old shoes to a dead maple tree in Springwater township?
  2. A 600 acre Waverley Quarry in the making?
  3. An 83-foot-high KKK fiery cross shone like a beacon over Barrie and Allandale in 1926 and the surrounding countryside
  4. Map showing areas of Midhurst Secondary Plan the Province will not dispute
  5. Is Metrus (DG Group) doing a deeply cynical end run by clear cutting the David Dunlap Forest in Richmond Hill?
  6. How much carbon dioxide does one mature sugar maple tree remove from the atmosphere?
  7. Corruption in local government: 5 Types
  8. Trees breathe for us
  9. Municipal corruption and Thomas Nast, cartoonist
  10. What legal duty of care does Springwater Township CAO Robert Brindley have to the citizens of Springwater Township?

Originally posted by Les Stewart from iLoveMidhurst.ca.

 


Walk for Water to Protect Lake Simcoe, September 2 to 11, 2015

August 15, 2015
  1. An invitation to walk to protect the natural world.

2015 waterwalk poster

A message from the Organizers:

Lake Simcoe was known as Waawaase’Aagaming or the Shining Lake to the Anishinaabe People who once lived in the area. This waterwalk is intended to re-establish the spiritual connection of our people to these waters and to remind of us our responsibility to maintain a good relationship with them. At one time these waters were pure and pristine and supported a wide range of wildlife both within the water and surrounding it. When we pray for the water we pray for the well-being and right to exist of all that life. It is an honour to carry the water, carry the eagle staff, do those prayers and sing those songs.

We are walking from September 2nd to September 11th starting and ending at Sibbald’s Point Provincial Park. Once we fill the vessel with water we do not stop until lunch break and day’s end when we touch down. If camping is available we will camp or we will accept accommodation from the people we meet along the way.

Both men and women and boys and girls are welcome to join us, walk with us and pray. We will have tents available but we ask that people be as self-sufficient as possible. We ask women to please wear a skirt if they would like a turn at carrying the water and we ask that men who will carry the staff to be drug and alcohol free and of a good mind to care for all of the people walking.

We will be providing some food and water and money to fuel vehicles that support the walk.

Please call 905-252-8003 for more information. Miigwech.

2. Same walk, another invitation to help from our friends at Food and Water First the people who defeated the Mega-Quarry in Orangeville are helping stop the Midhurst Secondary Plan.

Excerpt:

One of the key people in the successful fight to stop the Mega Quarry was Danny Beaton. In the spring of 2011, he led a group of First Nations, farmers, environmentalists and others on a walk from the lawns of Queen’s Park to the potato fields of Melancthon in order to highlight the threat the quarry posed to food and water.

Danny is about to walk again, and Food & Water First’s Carl Cosack will be joining him. You can, too! Starting September 2nd, Danny and supporters will spend nine days walking the shores of Lake Simcoe. The goal of Waterwalk 2015 is to remind us all of the need to protect the water that sustains us. For more information, please call 905-252-8003.

Everyone’ invited to help out in anyway they can.

Mega quarry group

Danny told me it was healing.

Quarry march

If i was only to walk for a day.


Big Dan: It’s all about the money, boys.

October 9, 2014

Making money in the Lord’s service.

Forced hookups (water then sewer bills) + Privatizing public utilities + Annexation

 


Margaret Atwood talks about these “sinister” Ontario and local politicians?

August 18, 2014

An important warning about the destruction of Wasaga Beach and Georgian Bay.

Atwood admonishment oh boy

Click here for video  or https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUDUKDVN27g.

175 views at 5 pm. 20140820

To Do:

  • Click here for information so you can write a hand-written letter to Premier Wynne complaining about this type of unfair propaganda.
  • And here to find out who are the other +44,600 fools who agree with these types of people.

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