Springwater Park contributes to students’ growth during Eduction Week and Mental Health Week

May 5, 2017

Being on the land promotes physical, mental and spiritual wholeness.

Barrie North Collegiate teacher Andrew Clark watches student Will Barry tackle the slack line during the school’s wellness day at Springwater Provincial Park on Wednesday, held in conjunction with Education Week and Mental Health Week. Beausoleil First Nations, which operates the park in partnership with Ontario Parks, also had representatives offering various sessions.

Ian McInroy of the Barrie Examiner writes in Wellness day more than a walk in Springwater Provincial Park:

Students experienced a variety of events that can contribute to positive overall wellness.

Barrie North staff led sessions on activities such as guitar playing and song-writing, Tai Chi, hiking, food and mood, among other things.

“We are also fortunate to have Beausoleil First Nations staff leading a medicine walk, drum circle and other sessions,” said Barrie North vice-principal Peter Bowman, who is part of the wellness team at the Grove Street school.

Beausoleil First Nations have operated Springwater in partnership with Ontario Parks since July 2015.

Bowman said having First Nations representatives take part was important.

“We are here in this part of the world and they were here a long time ago and had a whole bunch of things figured out,” he said. “I think we can learn from that and they are looking at doing some great things here at Springwater (park).”

And what do the students think?

Barrie North student Sam Sampson watched Beausoleil First Nations member Steve Beedie lead a fire-bow demonstration.

“Having First Nations here today is amazing,” she said, after watching fellow student Bree-Anne Bessey coaxing some smoke from the fire bow. “They were here before us. This is their land and we get to learn about their culture.


Methven A. “Matt” Adamson overcame many obstacles to found, nurture and defend Springwater Park.

May 4, 2016

A fellow forester told me recently that Major Adamson had to fight like hell with his superiors about the park’s very existence.

19490627 Adamson photo

From the Barrie Examiner June 27, 1949:

METHVEN A. “MATT” ADAMSON is superintendent of the Ontario Forestry Station at Midhurst. He is one of those responsible for the beautiful development at Springwater Park, picnic and recreational centre for thousands of Simcoe County folk and visitors from all over Canada and the United States.

Plaque Adamson

Plaque reads:

Springwater Park:  An everlasting tribute to the foresight, ingenuity and resourcefulness of Methven A. Adamson Superintendent Provincial Forest Station Midhurst during the period 1929 – 1956.

Plaque Adamson distance

Across from the Vespra Boys cairn, the main maintenance building in the back.

canadian-forestry-corps1

For more details, please see:


Did the Midhurst Secondary Plan sprawl development overrule Ontario’s own endangered species law?

November 27, 2015

Why didn’t the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry apply its own laws and protect the Minesing wetlands habitat for this at-risk species?

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Will Ontario continue to only listen to mega-sprawl developers?

An important article by Sara Carson at the Barrie Advance (not online), Rare dragonfly in Minesing wetlands declared at-risk speciespdf

An endangered dragonfly could lose its only known Canadian habitat if development takes place atop the Snow Valley ski hill, says Ellen Schwartzel, acting Environmental Commissioner of Ontario (ECO).

And she blames the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry for not doing enough to protect the Hine’s emerald dragonfly and its habitat in the Minesing wetlands.

“That was a very good example of where the science says this is what’s needed and where the ministry stopped short of protecting that habitat,” Schwartzel said.

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This Hine’s emerald dragonfly was spotted close to the Minesing Wetlands at North Simcoe Railtrail near Sunnidale Road. CHRIS EVANS

The ECO’s annual report released Nov. 3 and titled Small Things Matter, used the Hine’s emerald as one example of the province not following a species’ recovery strategy, prepared under the Endangered Species Act.

“The province has had the opportunity to show some on the ground successes for the Endangered Species Act, they haven’t yet done that. And that’s disappointing,” Schwartzel said.

The Hine’s emerald recovery strategy, created in 2013, recommends its protected habitat include the Snow Valley Uplands because its groundwater feeds the entire wetland. Schwartzel is calling on the ministry to take recommendations in the recovery strategy seriously because the area is under development pressure.

“Given the specificity of this recommendation in the recovery strategy, and with no explanation of the ministry’s decisions provided, the ECO concludes that the MNRF opted to favour development, rather than to prioritize the protection of this species at risk habitat,” the ECO’s annual report states.

The habitat regulation for Hine’s emerald includes a 500-metre area around the habitat used by the species. Ministry spokesperson Jolanta Kowalski said this area protects the flow of groundwater into the wetlands, and aquatic areas used by the species. But, she added, this does not mean development outside the habitat won’t require provincial approval.

“If activities outside this area are likely to have an adverse effect on the habitat, they may still require authorization under the Endangered Species Act to consider the needs of the species,” she said.

Kowalski added the recovery strategy is one source of information used to develop habitat regulations.

“Biological consideration of the species, community knowledge, socio-economics, and public input contribute to best available information by which habitat regulations are ultimately determined,” she said.

Chris Evans said it’s unknown what level of human disturbance this dragonfly can tolerate. BRERETON FIELD NATURALISTS’ CLUB PHOTO

Chris Evans, president of the Brereton Field Naturalists’ Club, discovered the Hine’s emerald here in 20074. It is also found in Wisconsin, Michigan, Illinois and Missouri. He said it’s unknown what level of human disturbance this dragonfly can tolerate.

“Perhaps its extirpation from other areas of Ontario indicates that we are damaging our aquifers and water supplies in ways we do not yet understand. Why not identify and protect all known and potential Hine’s emerald habitats from human development until we know the safe limits of our impacts?” he said.

Water levels are very important to the Hine’s emerald because these dragonflies reproduce and live as larvae in crayfish burrows that are very sensitive to disturbance, said local naturalist Bob Bowles. He takes part in the annual dragonfly count in the Minesing wetlands.

“Any development of the area would impact greatly on the Hine’s emerald,” Bowles said.

To read the Environmental Commissioner of Ontario’s report visit: http://eco.on.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/2014_2015-AR.pdf

To learn more about the Hine’s Emerald and to see its recovery strategy, visit ontario.ca/page/hines-emerald.


Save French’s Hill Forest article by Dr. John Bacher and Danny Beaton

October 1, 2015

Is a Waverley Mega Quarry in Tiny Township, Simcoe County worth this threat to the Alliston Aquifer…again?

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An original article from Dr. John Bacher:

Save French’s Hill Forest

Tiny Township is blessed to have some of the rarest and largest old growth forests in southern Ontario south of the Canadian Shield, an ecosystem known as the Mixed Woods Plains. It is tragic that one of the best examples of this precious and threatened relic of Turtle Island before the impact of Euro-Canadian colonization, is now threatened by a proposed zoning amendment. It would change the zoning of lands now protected as Rural and Agricultural and designated as Significant Forest by Tiny Township, to permit the expansion of the existing Beamish quarry.

In addition to devastating forests the Beamish quarry expansion proposal is an attack on the world’s purest water, the same important source for the Alliston Aquifer that was battled over in the long struggle against Dump Site 41. Elaine Stephenson a champion of the French’s Hill Forest, has explained how she appreciated from childhood how the purity of her well water from this unusual geological feature. On this basis the quarry scheme was denounced by a leading foe of Dump Site 41, Stephen Odgen, at a October 13, 2009 meeting of the Tiny Township Council.

Part of the opposition that the Beamish scheme encountered when it was put forward at two meeting of Tiny Township Council in the winter of 2015 was that the pit proposal should not go forward until the work of he Severn Sound Environmental Association on the natural heritage of Tiny Township is properly reflected in its land use planning and zoning documents. This is an excellent critique since current land use planning both in Tiny Township and throughout Simcoe County does not make the best use of scientific studies of wildlife habitat, forest cover and old growth.

The critique of residents who have mobilized themselves into a Save the Waverly Uplands alliance is bolstered by the background environmental research that has been done into the provincially significant woodlands that surround the existing Beamish quarry. The work of the Severn Sound group builds on an earlier study, which in a tragically slow way, is shaping environmental planning in Simcoe County. This is report on “The Development of a Natural Heritage System for Simcoe County.” It was prepared by the Gartner Lee engineering firm for the Simcoe County Council in 1996.

The Gartner Lee report, now almost two decades old, provides a reasonable way in which to protect Simcoe County’s forests. It called for the protection of large blocks of forests of around 40 hectares in size, which is responsible for the current mapping of French’s Hill as a provincially significant woodland. Such woodlands straddle both sides of the border between Tiny and Tay townships.

The slowness in the adaption of the Garner Lee report into the Simcoe County official plan is one of the reasons the municipality has been ridiculed by the respected Neptis Foundation as the “Wild West” of urban sprawl.

The Gartner Lee study recognizes that, “The extensive tracts of forests” that are found in Tiny Township “are important habitat for a number of forest interior species as well as for mammals such as Black Bear, Martin and Fisher which have large home ranges.”

The Gartner Lee report recognizes the value of the large tracts of forests that endure in Tiny Township that are old growth as surrounds the Beamish quarry. It expressed amazement that here there are still “vast tracts of forest” in predominately hardwood old growth conditions. They are it stressed, a vivid contrast to the coniferous plantations established in other parts of Simcoe County to rescue it from desertification.

The old growth forests of Tiny Township Garner Lee stressed “represent the last vestiges of what southern-Ontario looked like in pre-settlement times. Unlike much of southern Ontario, where the original woodlands have become highly fragmented” these forest remain in “unbroken forest blocks.” Such conditions it found are important for wildlife as “refuges from predation” for “foraging habitat” and to secure “diversity in the landscape.”

The insights of the Gartner Lee report in protecting the old growth forests of southern Ontario are reflected in the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) Natural Heritage Manual. They stress that old growth forests “are particularly valuable for several reasons, including their contributions of species genetics and ecosystem diversity.” One obvious example of this is that their survival allow winds and birds to transfer native hardwood species to managed plantation forests.

The MNR manual provides a careful definition of what constitutes an old growth forest. This is done through hitting any of three measures, age (around 100 years), basal area or diameter width. One basic approach is 10 or more trees at least 50 cm in diameter per hectare, or 8 trees of the same area of 40 cm.

When I saw tree cutting recently at French’s Hill I was horrified to see an old growth forest slashed for no apparent reason than to downgrade its rating in the MNR manual. The forest was of predominately giant sugar maples, regenerating in a healthy fashion with a blanket of seedlings. However, the quite recently stumps seemed to offer proofs that many giants had been cut with the deliberate purpose of reducing the density per hectare required to be considered an old growth forest.

Danny Beaton a Mohawk of the Turtle Clan has viewed the destruction of the French’s Hill Forest. On it he notes, that “The Nanfan Treaty states that the Iroquois Confederacy have a right to hunt and fish on our shared territories with the Ojibway, Huron and Wendat Nations in Georgian Bay. Why do corporations continuing to rape and pillage our forests, wetlands and water ways in Georgian Bay? Why do company’s continue to stake claim to the last endangered trees and forests with immunity from County of Simcoe Governance.? Why are citizens being ignored in county meetings that are set up for citizen participation and shared authority over land rights and development.? Are the lawyers, architects and engineers who support developers, the real threat to Mother Earth? Through unity and focus then can we organize our self for change and environmental protection through peaceful building and organizing our self. During Site 41 a unity of citizens, farmers and Torontonians emerged to defend and protect the Alliston Aquifer. Then the mega quarry was denounced by citizens, farmers, and native and good lawyers. We as citizens of Ontario must unite with the Conservation Authority, Environmental Organizations, Farmers, Native Nations and Good Minds with Good Hearted People before everything is cut down or polluted. Mother Earth is being raped on the French Hill in Waverly. The developer will say he bought the land which is old growth Sugar Maples and other hard wood trees so that all should be clear cut for a quarry As a Mohawk man with grade 6 education I can tell you from our Traditional Culture no one has the right to destroy this large unique incredibly beautiful healing place full of creation for our children’s children.”
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Posted on JohnBacherPhD.ca and iLoveMidhurst.ca.

Previous posts on the Waverley Mega Quarry;


How much cash does a corporation get when they cut down old-growth maple trees in Simcoe County?

September 30, 2015

Immediately and in preparation for a clear-cut (gravel pit expansion)?

20150425 Bleeding tree ...

Surely the net proceeds are less if you cut them down in the middle of the night?

Waverley Clearcut 3

Maybe higher In the middle of the 2015 winter (April 2015: Photos by Les Stewart)?

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I wonder if it was a licensed or non-licensed action against the old-growth maple canopy (September 2015, same)?

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Or thinning to show the “watchdog” authorities that the forest was worth less (worthless or degraded) and, therefore, should get the go ahead to clear-cut for aggregate expansion on top of the Alliston aquifer.

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See previous post on iLoveMidhurst.ca: A 600 acre Waverley Mega Quarry in the making?

Waverley Mega-Quarry


How frequently has SpringwaterParkcc.org been viewed since October 2012?

September 24, 2015

In total, 60,924 times, 1,647 monthly, or 54.9 views per day.

20150926 Traffic spcc

The 10 most viewed posts in 2015 are:

  1. Barrie Pow Wow at Springwater Park, June 13 and 14th
  2. The Fraud Triangle by Dr. David Cressey
  3. Mel Howell led by example.
  4. Cat’s-paw: a pawn or dupe
  5. Are the 31,000 acres of Simcoe County Forest really The Lungs of Barrie?
  6. My memories from the Waawaase’Aagaming (Lake Simcoe) Water Walk 2015
  7. Ontario parks have been severely underfunded for decades
  8. The Oshkimaadziig Unity Camp occupation of Awenda Provincial Park continues
  9. Grand re-opening of Springwater Park tomorrow!
  10. Corruption in local government: 5 Types

Cross-published by Les Stewart on iLoveMidhurst.ca.


Official re-opening of Springwater Park

July 31, 2015
reopens

Beausoleil First Nation Chief Jeff Monague, Chief Glen Hare, Chief Roland Monague and Grand Chief Anishinabek Patrick Madahbee open the traditional wampum belt that is displayed at First Nation ceremonies, such as the one at the grand opening of Springwater Provincial Park which will be run by by the Beausoleil First Nation. PHOTO: CHERYL BROWNE

Cheryl Browne reports for the Barrie Examiner Springwater park reopens with ceremony:

Four chiefs carefully laid out the wampum belt on a purple cloth in the pavilion in Springwater Provincial Park on Friday.

After years of negotiating with Ontario Parks and the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF), the two Beausoleil First Nation chiefs and two Anishinabek regional chiefs placed the wampum in a place of honour at the front table.

“The wampum belt represents the government and us. It represents all people and it’s a reminder that, instead of fighting, let’s work together,” said Deputy Grand Chief Glen Hare, a member of the Loon Clan.

“It is part of our culture, our teachings,” he added. “A lot of these things have come back to us now.”

Hare pointed to the front of the shelter where a traditional Beausoleil First Nation staff stood in the place of honour beside the regional eagle-feather leader stand representing 39 provincial First Nation territories, beside the flag of Ontario.

After prayers were said in Anishinaabe, more than 100 people gathered to be smudged, including Springwater Mayor Bill French, Barrie MPP Ann Hoggarth, Barrie Coun. Rose Romita, several Ontario Provincial Police officers, as well as Scott Thomas of the MNRF.

Thomas worked tirelessly with the Beausoleil First Nation during the women’s occupation of the park from April 2, 2013 until December.

The women left the park once the province ensured the First Nation a deal would be worked out to share the park.

Beausoleil Chief Jeff Monague welcomed the visitors to what is now a partnership between the Beausoleil First Nation and Ontario Parks until 2019.

“We are now going forward, walking that path together for the first time in many, many years,” Monague said. “We want to build a better place for everyone in Ontario, where rights are given to indigenous people across the province.”

The five-year deal will allow Beausoleil staff to run the day-park under funding from the Ministry of Aboriginal Affairs, with hopes of using the 12 kilometres of hiking trails, picnic facilities and playing fields to teach aboriginal ways.

When the MNRF closed the park gates in 2013, Springwater was home to 29 orphaned animals which were moved to an assortment of wildlife sanctuaries across Canada.

Of the other 10 parks the ministry changed to non-operational status — including Caliper Lake in Nestor Falls, Fushimi Lake in Hearst, Greenwater in Cochrane, Ivanhoe Lake in Foleyet, Mississagi in Elliot Lake, Obatanga near Wawa, Rene Brunelle in Kapuskasing, Tidewater in Moosonee and The Shoals in Chapleau — three parks were kept open by their municipalities, including Ivanhoe, Rene Brunelle and Fushimi.

French, who initially inherited the non-operational park when he became mayor, said he’s delighted to hear of the agreement.

“Welcome everyone to this sacred and precious land in the middle of our wonderful township,” French said.

After winning the mayoral seat last October, French became involved with park, insisting township staff plow the roads during winter and cut the grass in time for a recent powwow.

“I think, as a township, we should have taken more of a co-ordinating role in the discussions, but we didn’t,” he said. “But we will now.”

The Misty River drummers, six men in all, played the traditional, rhythmic flag song on a communal drum, singing in many voices which echoed across the park resounding above the loud thumps of the single drum.

Large tables were heaped with food for the reception following the grand opening, with plenty of food and room at the pavilion tables for all who attended.

cheryl.browne@sunmedia.ca

Twitter.com/cherylbrowne1


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