Charlie Day was a model Midhurst resident.

April 26, 2016

Charlie and Jean Day were my next-door neighbours on Bayfield Street when I was growing up.

19510222 Charles Day photo

From The Barrie Examiner, Thursday February 22, 1951:

Charles E. Day was recently elected president of the Barrie and District Civil Service Association. Previous experience with the association includes two years on the executive and six years with the sub-committee of the Department Council.

He is presently work foreman at the Midhurst Forestry Station, having been with the reforestry since 1928.

Born in Cambridge, England, Mr. Day received his education in that country. Upon finishing continuation school, he came to Canada and took up farming in Flos Township from 1920 to 1922. He farmed in the West the following year, returning east in 1924 to begin four years with the CPR.

Mr. Day left the employ of the CPR in 1928 and joined the staff of the Midhurst Reforestry as accountant.

He married the former L. Anne McGinnis of Midhurst in 1929 and they have one son, William. A member of St. Paul’s Anglican Church, Midhurst, Mr. Day has been warden of that church since 1929, with the exception of the war years.

He is a past master of Kerr Lodge AF&AM, Barrie, a member of the Lodge of Perfection, Scottish Rite, and Spry Sovereign Rose Croix Lodge, Barrie. A member of the Canadian Legion, Vespra Branch [149]. Mr. Day was president from 1936 to 1945. He saw war service in both World Wars. In the first war he served in the British Army with the 12th division, Kitchener’s Army. He joined the Grey and Simcoe Foresters  in 1940 and served with the A&T Staff till his discharge in 1945.

Mr. Day is an ardent hunter, and was connected with the Midhurst Athletic Club as secretary-treasurer from 1929 to 1934.

Mr. Robert Peacock was the only other Midhurst resident to serve in both World Wars.

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Just a reminder about Remembrance Day at Springwater Park on November 11th

November 2, 2013

And a plea not to change what community leaders built circa 1929.

Clint Lovell2

Restore only as is necessary to preserve the design and structural integrity of a community heritage gem. When in doubt, do nothing and respect the builders’ thoughts and actions

A nice announcement by A Channel on October 31st about Remembrance Day (click here for details) called, Local students take on special Remembrance Day project:

Excerpt:

Students at Eastview Secondary School in Barrie have taken on a special project for Remembrance Day.

They’re researching the soldiers who are commemorated by the cenotaph at Springwater Park.

The Cenotaph, dedicated to the soldiers from Vespra who died in World War I, is being rededicated. The Friends of Springwater Park started the project and the students are helping learn more about the 23 names carved on the memorial.

Half a dozen students are doing the work and will be reading a little bit about the soldiers they are researching at the rededication on Remembrance Day.

Let’s hope Nancy Bigelow and the Friends of Springwater Park and Mr. Clint Lovell are not changing the monument by putting the names on a plaque and fixing the plaque on the cairn. The intent of men who built the cairn (Maj. Meth Adamsonwho directed it being built), Robert Peacock, Harvey Spence and Charlie Day) was NOT to record the names.

The sacrifice was borne largely by the deceased and their family but the whole community was affected.

Someone did check with Major Adamson’s children and grandchildren (many with prominent lives in Barrie) before they planned to change his design, didn’t they? Or at least the Springwater Heritage Committee. Right?

Why do people think they know better than those that death has silenced? if they wanted the names, don’t you think they would have done it back then? Are they listening even now?

Charlie Day and me


The abandonment of Springwater Park could have been be interpreted as an unprovoked attack against a community.

May 19, 2013

An enemy’s assault against the life’s work of gentleman and ladies who built places just like Midhurst, all our province.

Sun Tzu

Their defense was likely to be opposed in a strategic, intelligent and disciplined manner.

Quotes:

Appraise war in terms of the fundamental factors. The first of these factors is moral influence.

Day Charlie Jean

Charlie and Jean Day

The skillful employer of men will employ the wise man, the brave man, the covetous man, and the stupid man.

If your opponent is of choleric temperament [fundamentally ambitious and leader-like], seek to irritate him.


The Huronia Woodland Owners’ Association invites SPCC to talk about Springwater Provincail Park closing

December 19, 2012

I spoke at the White Pine Award meeting on November 17, 2012 at the Elmvale Royal Canadian Legion Branch 262.

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I joined this group this year and Chairman John Keeling was kind enough to include me on his agenda.

Huronia board

One of our highest profile program is the Maple Tree Replacement program. I planted three last spring in my own yard to complete what Charlie Day had started. Spaced 25 feet apart, they’ll be just a lovely hard wood border to the south west back of the Midhurst Library on Finlay Mill Road and our home in just 30 years

Huronia maple distribution

Over 190 members very interested in sustainable forestry in Simcoe County.

Huronia members paws off

The Midhurst area has a wealth of world-class forestry expertise that yields concrete economic and health benefits every year to its residents

Huronia Patch

Bruce Keeling (left, with Jim Laking) was awarded the White Pine Award for his great contributions to private woodlots.

For sale 128

The trees are ordered and were distributed this year at the Oro Fairgrounds in the spring.

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With over 12,000 native trees planted since 2006, the Maple Tree Replacement program is well worth private…

For sale 130

..and our public agency’s moral and financial support.

Interested in joining this very worthwhile effort? Please contact Carl at campcrcc-at-aol.com.


The people who propose this must worship at the altar of ugliness!

October 24, 2012

Thoughtful, intelligent and caring communities build on the past. Don’t they?

Are we so short-sighted and lacking in confidence? Have we forgotten that today, we stand on our ancestors’ shoulders and hold the future in trust for our children?

In The Midhurst Secondary Plan: Let’s think again!Word pdf Bill Nieuwland is able to compress and express forty years of beauty and folly in a wonderfully elegant manner:

When I moved to Vespra Township more than forty years ago, it was an area of beautiful natural and agricultural landscape. Midhurst was a small village of mostly modest homes scattered along a few quiet streets. For the most part, residents wisely relied on the wooded terrain to enhance the settings of their homes. Subsequent small developments took their cue from the examples set before them. Thanks to the foresight of those who have come before, this village is a jewel of Simcoe County. Word of this bucolic hamlet soon spread. New arrivals were drawn to it because of the opportunities for a wholesome and healthy family and community life. However, it seems that some powers decided that all this was more than its residents deserved. And so, they imposed on it a planning regime that would overwhelm the community.

On the Midhurst Secondary Plan:

Now Midhurst is to be drawn and quartered. The streets that were laid in the heart of the village more than a hundred years ago are to become busy thoroughfares with tens of thousands of vehicles per day. There will be very few local employment opportunities for the thousands of new residents. The mass of commuters will need to go as far afield as Toronto. They will leave bleary eyed in the early morning and return exhausted in the evening. Commuting by public transit or bicycle will be all but impossible. Old Midhurst will become a pedestrian and cycling nightmare.

Bill’s writing reminds me of stories I’ve been told of people I’ve heard of and known, like Meth Adamson, Ike Merritt, Charles Bowdery, George Monteith, Rid Groves, Harvey Spence, Les Willis, Charlie Day, Dick Pierce, and Dick Brown.

If you want to see what Midhurst’s spirit can build, look to Springwater Park.

Springwater Park was planned and crafted out of a desert of sand when everyone thought it was of no value. So was the Midhurst Tree Nursery.

They  used to call it the Commons. It wasn’t worth anything. Alan Johnston

Every pond was man-made working in concert with the gift of abundant water.

Bill Nieuwland expresses an elegant alternate view to the present slash and burn mentality.

Originally published on iLoveMidhurst.ca on March 2, 2012.


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