Charlie Day was a model Midhurst resident.

April 26, 2016

Charlie and Jean Day were my next-door neighbours on Bayfield Street when I was growing up.

19510222 Charles Day photo

From The Barrie Examiner, Thursday February 22, 1951:

Charles E. Day was recently elected president of the Barrie and District Civil Service Association. Previous experience with the association includes two years on the executive and six years with the sub-committee of the Department Council.

He is presently work foreman at the Midhurst Forestry Station, having been with the reforestry since 1928.

Born in Cambridge, England, Mr. Day received his education in that country. Upon finishing continuation school, he came to Canada and took up farming in Flos Township from 1920 to 1922. He farmed in the West the following year, returning east in 1924 to begin four years with the CPR.

Mr. Day left the employ of the CPR in 1928 and joined the staff of the Midhurst Reforestry as accountant.

He married the former L. Anne McGinnis of Midhurst in 1929 and they have one son, William. A member of St. Paul’s Anglican Church, Midhurst, Mr. Day has been warden of that church since 1929, with the exception of the war years.

He is a past master of Kerr Lodge AF&AM, Barrie, a member of the Lodge of Perfection, Scottish Rite, and Spry Sovereign Rose Croix Lodge, Barrie. A member of the Canadian Legion, Vespra Branch [149]. Mr. Day was president from 1936 to 1945. He saw war service in both World Wars. In the first war he served in the British Army with the 12th division, Kitchener’s Army. He joined the Grey and Simcoe Foresters  in 1940 and served with the A&T Staff till his discharge in 1945.

Mr. Day is an ardent hunter, and was connected with the Midhurst Athletic Club as secretary-treasurer from 1929 to 1934.

Mr. Robert Peacock was the only other Midhurst resident to serve in both World Wars.

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Just a reminder about Remembrance Day at Springwater Park on November 11th

November 2, 2013

And a plea not to change what community leaders built circa 1929.

Clint Lovell2

Restore only as is necessary to preserve the design and structural integrity of a community heritage gem. When in doubt, do nothing and respect the builders’ thoughts and actions

A nice announcement by A Channel on October 31st about Remembrance Day (click here for details) called, Local students take on special Remembrance Day project:

Excerpt:

Students at Eastview Secondary School in Barrie have taken on a special project for Remembrance Day.

They’re researching the soldiers who are commemorated by the cenotaph at Springwater Park.

The Cenotaph, dedicated to the soldiers from Vespra who died in World War I, is being rededicated. The Friends of Springwater Park started the project and the students are helping learn more about the 23 names carved on the memorial.

Half a dozen students are doing the work and will be reading a little bit about the soldiers they are researching at the rededication on Remembrance Day.

Let’s hope Nancy Bigelow and the Friends of Springwater Park and Mr. Clint Lovell are not changing the monument by putting the names on a plaque and fixing the plaque on the cairn. The intent of men who built the cairn (Maj. Meth Adamsonwho directed it being built), Robert Peacock, Harvey Spence and Charlie Day) was NOT to record the names.

The sacrifice was borne largely by the deceased and their family but the whole community was affected.

Someone did check with Major Adamson’s children and grandchildren (many with prominent lives in Barrie) before they planned to change his design, didn’t they? Or at least the Springwater Heritage Committee. Right?

Why do people think they know better than those that death has silenced? if they wanted the names, don’t you think they would have done it back then? Are they listening even now?

Charlie Day and me


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