Canadian Forestry Corps: for each fighting soldier, 5 trees needed to be sacrificed for us to be free.

November 7, 2013

A crisis in wood production is met by experienced Canadian forestry professionals.

Canadian Forestry Corps1

A very interesting look into a little known branch of the Canadian military. some excerpts and images from a Bob Briggs article:

Canadian Forestry Corps (CFC)
In both World War I and World War II the Canadian government formed the Canadian Forestry Corps (CFC), in answer to the British government’s request for overseas woodsmen to cover a workforce shortage in Britain. In WWII, the CFC consisted of around 30 companies that were sent to work, mainly in Scotland, but also elsewhere in Europe. Although a military unit, the CFC’s main task was to cut down trees, not fight. They focused on recruiting men who were already experienced in forestry; few had military experience. As the unit did not exist as part of the pre-war army it had to be recruited from scratch; a soldier’s rank therefore often depended on his previous status in the forestry industry

….

The war created a crisis in wood supply for the United Kingdom. Pre-war domestic production covered only a small fraction of the timber needed to support the war effort. In addition to civilian requirements, it was estimated that every soldier needed five trees: one for living quarters, messing, and recreation; one for crates to ship food, ammunition, tanks, and so on; and three for explosives, gun stocks, coffins, ships, factories, and direct or indirect support for the fighting line.

Wikipedia: Canadian Forestry Corps

CanadianSoldiers.com

CFC map1

Source ‘The Sawdust Fusiliers’ book by William C Wonders. Map shows the city where each of the first twenty companies of the CFC were mobilized from, plus a chart that indicates the percentage of soldiers each province provided.

The Commonwealth looks to Canada for expertise in forestry practices with Ontario supplying almost 40 per cent of these “overseas woodsmen”:

Once again the British Government turned to Overseas Woodsman to assist in the war effort. Given their impressive record in World War One it was natural that they looked to Canada to provide forestry units once again. In May 1940 the Canadian Government decided to form a Canadian Forestry Corps. Twenty Companies were initially formed with ten more as the war progressed.

The financial agreement between the two Governments as similar to that in World War I. Canada would bear the cost of pay, allowances and pensions, all initial personal equipment, transport to and from the United Kingdom. The British Government paid for “all other services connected with equipment, work or maintenance” and certain others, including medical services. Canada covered the cost for Medical Officers and Britain paid for hospitalization.

The arrangement was unusual as it resulted in a Canadian Unit working for the British, who controlled the areas of work and disposal of the product, but Military operations of the C.F.C. was never surrendered by the Canadians and came under command of Canadian Military Headquarters in London. Even though the C.F.C. had to serve two masters, no serious problems ever resulted.

CFC cat1

Sir Charles Ross was one of the first people to use caterpillar tractors to harvest trees, as can be seen in this image from his estate. Later the CFC instigated the widespread use of this machinery in Scotland. © Tain & District Museum Trust. Licensor

The professionals from No. 14 Company go to Scotland to help:

Prior to the arrival of the Canadian lumberjacks there were various undertakings by the British Government to aid in the harvesting of limber for their own use. Such contributions were helpful, but on occasion the efforts of unskilled workers created problems for the professionals later.

The No. 14 Coy brought with them the most up-to-date logging equipment then available in Canada. They brought a standard medium type rotary mill with a capacity of 1500-2000 bd. ft. an hour or c. 8,000 cu. ft a week/3-5-4-7 cm an hour or 227 cm a week. (The British Forestry Commission also provided the company with a Scotch mill or bench, but these were not popular with the Canadians.) Power was supplied by 100-horsepowe Diesel generators. Logging equipment included TD9 caterpillar tractors, lorries, sulkies (pneumatic-tired arches), angle dozers for road making, and two and three drum winches for high-lead logging. They also were equipped with a variety of transportation vehicles, four tractors, two sulkies, one motorcycle, and originally six bicycles.

CFC truck1

Heavy CFC logging truck. Courtesy of the Private Charles Frederick Neale Collection

Canadian soldiers have always been welcomed in the Commonwealth and elsewhere for a very good reason…they’re community oriented:

The CFC was apparently well liked in the Scottish Highlands. The men became active participants in local functions, from fundraising to staging Christmas parties for the local children. Many times, scrap wood mysteriously fell from lorries beside homes in need of fuel. A notable tribute to the CFC was paid by Laura Lady Lovat when she stated, “you Canadians may be cutting the Scots firs of the Highlands, but in Highland hearts you are planting something far more lasting”.

CFC bridge1

Bridge building crew. Photo Courtesy of Mitchell Bell

Professional Canadian warriors know how to be good guests in a community:

Members of the CFC were seen in uniform regularly at local parades in support of varied wartime causes. In addition to their distinctive cap badges and shoulder patches, from Mar 1943 the CFC were identified by a green triangle below the ‘Canada’ flash on the upper arm of the battle dress.

Church parades also brought them to the public’s attention as the No. 9 Coy made use of the local church buildings as well as holding religious services in the camp.

CFC personnel went out of their way to make Christmas Day memorable for the local children, many of whom came from poor crofts and many of whose fathers were away in the service. No. 14 Company at Wilderness Camp also donated toys made by its members in their own time, for sale in Aviemore and Inverness on behalf of the Red Cross Fund. Personnel gave up their rations of candy so that the children might have them.

One such overseas woodsman was Major  Methven Alexander Adamson, No. 14 Company, Canadian Forestry Corps. He was the Midhurst Forest Station and Springwater Park superintendent from 1929 to 1956.

Through sacrifice

Superintendents

Springwater Park

  • Ike Merritt, I.C. 1922 – 1927
  • G. Richard Lane 1927 – 1929
  • Methven A. Adamson 1929 – 56
  • Cyril Jackson 1934 – 1975
  • William R. Wilson 1975 – 1996
  • Gordon Murphy 1996 – 1998
  • Bradley Warren 1998 – 2008
  • Thomas Wilson 2008 –
  • Scott Thomas 2013 – current

Midhurst Forest Station

  • Ike Merritt, I.C. 1922 – 1927
  • G. Richard. Lane 1927 – 1929
  • Methven A. Adamson 1929 – 1956
  • John M. Halpenny 1956 – 1969
  • C. Rid Groves 1969 – 1983
  • Kenneth Reese 1983 – 1993
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Who is responsible for the sandblasting, damage and repair of the circa 1929 Vespra Boys cenotaph at Springwater Park – Camp Nibi?

October 15, 2013

I took these photographs on Friday October 11, 2013. This monument had never been sand blasted in its 84 year history.

Back 34 cropped

Note the broken corner of the cairn main pedestal at the front right.

The Vespra Boys is made up of three very different materials: granite field stones, concrete mortar and marble.

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Another view with the broken urn base at the left back. The MNR-owned heritage-designated building in the back is the original park office.

Each material has it’s own much different properties such as porosity, hardness, strength, etc.

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Detail of broken urn base.

One of the key heritage preservation principles is to try to do no harm. Start with the mildest, least destructive means to the stated, justifiable end.

Back marble sign

Note how the years of patina soak so deeply in the mortar. To get a consistent “new look” the mortar would have to be blasted up to one inch deep.

I was told that the Ministry of Natural Resources considers any of their buildings that are over 50 years old to be “heritage” and extreme caution must be taken. I do not know if those standards apply to community cultural assets that they have legal stewardship for.

Face marble no relief

Front: The softest material (white marble) is easily destroyed with silica sand. The text is almost unreadable now. The contrast between the 3 media is lost. Many of the stones have horizontal etch marks now. Note how the light orange, protective patina has been destroyed. When marble is polished it changes the physical properties of its surface. By sand lasting the raised and relief areas, the contrast is lost. The sharpness of the relief lettering is much less.

Over the years, objects as well as people acquire character. Patina is a much-valued characteristic by many people that appreciate things that have endured. In stone, sand blasting destroys this highly-prized protective layer; the earned look and feel of a well-worn artifact. The cold-hard facts are that etched monuments will likely have more structural problems in the future than if it were more gently treated. The Ontario Heritage Trust talks of The Conservation Cycle.

NICMM 3

The before picture: In 2013, Major John R. Fisher took these photographs in support of the registration to the Department of Defence of the Vespra Boys cairn. There are less than 6,700 of these nationally-registered war memorials in Canada in 2013. It’s magnificent as it was and precisely how the builders envisioned it in 1929, I believe. Note the irregular patina that is appropriate for its age and nature and the sharpness of the relief edges.

Sand blasting is known to radically alter the appearance, life and strength of materials. it is the most aggressive form of abrasive cleaning and is usually the last method used.

Front cross

The after picture: The field stone/mortar joints have been opened up for water to freeze and thaw. There are only surface cracks evident over the whole monument. There is no safety issue. The symbol may indicate the builders’ were concerned in pleasing an entity other then their own ego.

Silica sand appears to be the material used against the Vespra Boys centotaph. There are chips of mortar and stone all over the grass.

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There are different grades of silica sand available. The most destructive are the cheapest. There are bits and pieces of stones, mortar and sand 2 to 3 metres away from the cairn.

Sand blasting is classified as a form of abrasive blasting.

Abrasive blasting is the operation of forcibly propelling a stream of abrasive material against a surface under high pressure to smooth a rough surface, roughen a smooth surface, shape a surface, or remove surface contaminants. A pressurized fluid, typically air, or a centrifugal wheel is used to propel the blasting material (often called the media). The first abrasive blasting process was patented by Benjamin Chew Tilghman on 18 October 1870.

There are several variants of the process, such as bead blasting, sand blasting, sodablasting, and shot blasting.

Background: At a meeting at the site arranged by Ontario Parks Zone Manager Mr. Ken Lacroix this summer, I opposed the use of chemicals being applied and then having it power blasted with high pressure water. This elicited a very strong reaction by a representative of Ian Taylor’s, Friends of Springwater Park. I was not informed of any plans to alter the monument although I take Minister David Orazietti at his word when he said he appreciates my interest in the park.

Mr. Taylor appears to be taking credit for this “restoration” project on his Facebook page (see Sept 29th). He also thanks his good friends Patrick Brown Barrie MP, Ms. Nancy Bigelow, Ken Lacroix, Park Superintendent Scott Thomas,  Monument Restoration Ltd., Barrie Legion 147 and Elmvale Legion 262.

CFB Borden, the Department of National Defence, Springwater Township and City Barrie Heritage Committees, Camp Nibi grandmothers/occupiers or the families of the 18 WWI dead appear not to have been consulted, accommodated or included in his thanks.

I have asked the Ministry of Natural Resources to secure the site and not allow any further work until more is known about some may consider a pre-meditated assault on heritage on what is claimed to be protected Ontario land.


An Anishinaabe tipi now graces Springwater Park – Camp Nibi in Midhurst.

August 6, 2013

A beautiful addition to the abandoned Ontario Parks lands was built on August 4, 2013.

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A perfect compliment to the existing spiritual practices dwellings:  (l to r) sweat lodge and teaching lodge.

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Nestled just past the Vespra Boys cenotaph.

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Straight through the cathedral of pines, at the bottom of the hill entrance.

Tipi through trees nibi

Come and have your children or grandchildren’s photograph taken at this special place. Lots of families did just that this weekend!

Also, feel free to express your opinion about why aboriginal treaty rights to practice their spiritual practices should not be interfered with or bitched about.

  1. Premier of Ontario,
  2. MNR Minister and staff,
  3. County Provincial Members of Parliament,
  4. Mr. Patrick Brown and Hon. Kellie Leitch, MP, and
  5. Mr. Ian Taylor 

FYI: To see Mr. Ian Taylor‘s response to this post, click here and go to Comment 9 or see below:

“I hope an environmental assesment was made before any of these structures where built! it’s called respect for Mother Earth and is the law!
Thank you.”


Does Ian Taylor and his Friends of Springwater Provincial Park group have any authority, whatsoever, from the Ministry of Natural Resources to do anything especially collect $?

August 2, 2013

Apparently not.

Programs

Image first appearing on Friends of Springwater Provincial Park Facebook, July 12, 2013

No agreement. No permission to do work in park. No permission to issue annual passes to Springwater Park. No supervision whatsoever.

In fact, explicitly the MNR is not responsible for Mr. Taylor’s fundraising.

The Ministry of Natural Resources is not responsible for their actions nor does it take a role in determining whether or not this group has any legal authority in promoting their fund raising efforts in this fashion.

1. My email to Superintendent Scott Thomas RE:  above image.

From: Les Stewart
Sent: July 13, 2013 6:49 AM
To: Thomas, Scott (MNR)
Subject: Friends of Springwater fundraising

Scott,

I was wondering if you could clarify whether or not Ian Taylor and his group has the legal authority to collect money from Barrie area businesses based on issuing annual passes, naming rights to trails, constructing gardens, etc. regarding Springwater Provincial Park as suggested in the attached image?

The jpg file appears to be a brochure that appears on Mr. Taylor’s Facebook page which is designed to solicit up to $20,000 per business over time from individual Barrie business owners for services that, in part, would require MNR approval.

I have been a small business person for over 20 years and would want to communicate very clearly to my business associates whether or not the Ministry of Natural Resources and Ontario Parks has authorized or stands behind the Friends of Springwater Provincial Park in their collection of these monies.

Regards,

Les


Mr. Les Stewart MBA
Springwater Park Citizens’ Coalition
1201 Bayfield Street North
Midhurst ON L0L 1X1
705 737-4635 Tel
705 627-2242 Cell
SpringwaterParkcc.org

2. Response to email by Park Management Specialist, Ken Lacroix (July 23rd):

Hi Les

Scott has provided me with a number of emails regarding your inquiries about the Friends of Springwater Provincial Park led by Ian Taylor. I am pleased to respond.

The use of the “Friends of” name is not restricted for use by any group nor is it trade marked by Ontario Parks. Throughout Ontario, there are a number of “Friends of” groups that are recognized in agreements with Ontario Parks. These groups are registered charities with objectives that are consistent with the management objectives of the Park. These recognized “Friends of” groups carry out activities to supplement and enhance the services offered by Ontario Parks in respect of the Park and raise funds to contribute to Ontario Parks.

The group that your correspondence refers to as identifying itself as “Friends of Springwater Provincial Park” does not have an agreement with Ontario Parks nor do they have permission to conduct any work or issue passes in the park at this time. As such, we do not consider this group to be a recognized “Friends of” organization. The Ministry of Natural Resources is not responsible for their actions nor does it take a role in determining whether or not this group has any legal authority in promoting their fund raising efforts in this fashion.

Regards

Ken

So…Where is the money going ’cause zero of it has made it out to park since April 1st?


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